Scientist Biography

Overton Brown, Jamaica, West Indies Scientist burst onto the reggae scene in the early 70's with a reckless mixing style that seemed to outdo even King Tubby's wildest extravaganzas. He began his career as an engineer at King Tubby's in 1978. Shortly afterwards he became a protege of King Tubby, and swiftly gained a reputation with his unique mixing style. In 1980, the UK-based record company Greensleeves began to release the productions of top Jamaican producer Henry 'Junjo' Lawes Lawes, finding success with new singing sensation Barrington Levy, used Tubby's studio for his voicing and final mix-downs and offered Greensleeves a couple of dub albums mixed by Tubby's sensational young engineer, The Scientist, VS Prince Jammy (1980), mostly consisting of dub mixes of Barrington Levy tracks. This album was presented as The "Big Showdown" between the two dubmasters. The combination of heavyweight Roots Radics rhythms pitted against one another Greensleeves followed this album with another proclaiming The Scientist to be the Heavyweight Dub Champion. The Scientist soon became Jamaica's top recordimg engineer This led to a surge of albums mixed by The Scientsit from various sources. Greensleeves, in particular, continued to issue album after album.



In the 70's, I started building sound system audio amplifiers. I would then test the amplifier with test instruments to determine how the amplifier was performing. Everything would look normal, but when I played reggae music through the amplifier, it would over heat. The plates of the KT88 would run red, especially when I played a mix from the great King Tubby'sthat had subsonic drum and bass frequencies as well as razor sharp high frequencies I would have to re -bais the KT88 and make other changes in order to accommodate reggae's wide frequency response and high slew rate needs. I noticed when I played other types of music the amplifier would respond normal. I found that to be strange so I used King Tubby's mixes as a platform to ensure that the amplifiers would not break down under extreme conditions. I was fascinated by his exclusive style of mixing and unique sound effects. It was the "Roots of Dub" dub album produced by Bunny Lee that became my favorite test album and also inspired me to want to meet him. One day, I was repairing a television for a friend who had worked for King Tubby's. We needed a transformer and King Tubby's was the only place who had those particular types of transformers I was so excited to meet this brilliant man and considered myself very lucky to have had this opportunity After that, it became a regular place for me to buy special made power and output transformers for the amplifiers that I was building King Tubby's became impressed with my electronic skills and abilities at such a young age. I told him I wanted to build a mixing console, a real joke to him. We joked about making mixing consoles with moving faders and automation. Years later It became a realty in Neve's moving faders and SSL's automation with total recall.



How does Reggae music help the electronic industry?

Back in the late seventies a lot of radio stations' record-mastering plants were scared to play reggae on their equipment because transmitter would over modulate and the record cutting machine would go into protection mode to prevent the high frequencies from burning up the cutting heads. Spider man at Dynamics Studio in Jamaica would have to use extra helium to keep the cutting heads cool. Reggae is like the Indy 500 racing driver to audio equipment whenever an audio system can handle reggae's wide frequency response and high slew rate you know you have a good system. Reggae music pushes audio equipment to the extreme. Back in England and Europe Where reggae is more popular, companies like Tanoy, SSL, Neve, Goodman, Studar and all the major brands dominate our recording industry in the US. They have bin using reggae to final test audio equipment long before us in the USA. A few company in the USA like AST audio in New York uses reggae to show off Crown's superior performance Crown is one of the best amplifier in the world made in USA when ever I use a Crown amplifier I don't have to worry about overheating or the amplifier clipping they can handle a lot of abuse.



Valerie Crawford

Scientist Bio from Discogs

Born: April 18th, 1960 in Kingston, Jamaica.



Biography

Hopeton Brown better known as The Scientist and sometimes known as Overton Brown, from Kingston, Jamaica was a protégé of King Tubby (Osbourne Ruddock), one of the originators of dub music. The Scientist burst onto the reggae scene in the early ’70s with a reckless mixing style that seemed to outdo even King Tubby’s wildest extravaganzas. He began his career as an engineer at Tubby’s in the mid 70’s. Shortly afterwards, he gained a reputation with a distinctive mixing style.



He left King Tubby's studio at the end of the 70’s and became the principal engineer for Channel One Studio, giving him the chance to work on a 16-track mixing desk rather than the four tracks at Tubby's. He came to prominence in the early 1980s and produced many albums, his mixes featuring on many releases in the first part of the decade. In particular, he was the favourite engineer of Henry "Junjo" Lawes, for whom he mixed several albums featuring the Roots Radics, many based on tracks by Barrington Levy. He also did a lot of work for Linval Thompson and Jah Thomas. In 1982 he left Channel One to work at Tuff Gong studio.



He made a series of albums in the early 1980s, released on Greensleeves Records with titles themed around Scientist's fictional achievements in fighting Space Invaders, Pac-Men, and Vampires, and winning the World Cup. The music on these albums was played by Roots Radics, his most frequent collaborators.



Five of his songs from the album The Scientist Rids the World of the Evil Curse of the Vampires were used as the playlist songs on the K-Jah radio station in the 2001 video game Grand Theft Auto 3.



“In the ’70s, I started building sound system audio amplifiers. I would then test the amplifier with test instruments to determine how the amplifier was performing. Everything would look normal, but when I played reggae music through the amplifier, it would over heat and the plates of the KT88 would run red, especially when I played a mix from the great King Tubby’s that had subsonic drum and bass frequencies as well as razor sharp high frequencies I would have to re -bias the KT88 and make other changes in order to accommodate reggae’s wide frequency response and high slew rate needs. I noticed when I played other types of music the amplifier would respond normal. I found that to be strange so I used King Tubby’s mixes as a platform to ensure that the amplifiers would not break down under extreme conditions.



I was fascinated by his exclusive style of mixing and unique sound effects. It was the “Roots of Dub” dub album produced by Bunny Lee that became my favourite test album and also inspired me to want to meet him. One day, I was repairing a television for a friend who had worked for King Tubby’s, we needed a transformer and King Tubby’s was the only place who had those particular types of transformers I was so excited to meet this brilliant man and considered myself very lucky to have had this opportunity. After that, it became a regular place for me to buy special made power and output transformers for the amplifiers that I was building. King Tubby’s became impressed with my electronic skills and abilities at such a young age. I told him I wanted to build a mixing console, at first, it sounded like a joke to him we joked about making mixing consoles with moving faders and automation. Years later .... Click here to read the full bio on DISCOGS.


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