The Hives

The Hives Biography

It turns out the HIVES have not split up, died, gone into politics or grown up as some of the more recent rumours would have it. It turns out they have been DIGGING! Yes, that is correct. They have spent the last year and a half since they stopped touring relentlessly excavating the backyard of Hive Manor, attempting something people said they would be crazy to try. It was said to be a myth. An Eldorado, an Atlantis, a Loch Ness monster, an Apollo program. Count on the HIVES to prove them all wrong cause here it is...


But let’s take it from the top, shall we? Yes, let’s!

When, in 2001, they played 250+ shows, wowed audiences from Tokyo to Trondheim, from Glasgow to Georgia, reintroduced rock in the mainstream (No, I mean actual ROCK MUSIC) and truly became everybody and their mama’s new favourite band, their plan had already been in action for seven years. Formed in the small industrial town of Fagersta, Sweden in 1993, the Hives, then in their early teens, were saved from boredom and despair by Mr. Randy Fitzsimmons. He came to them with the idea to start a musical group based on everything he and the band found exciting.

After teaching themselves to play instruments and then practising, perfecting and polishing their craft, they released their first album Barely Legal in 1997 to much acclaim. A perfect statement of teenage willpower over pretty much everything else, it was hailed by people fed up with the staleness of contemporary rock. Here was a band with roots but a mind of their own. Style and grace yet swerve and brute force. Not to mention the sheer energy to power the watch on your wrist and the sun in the sky. Touring commenced and took them several laps around Sweden and Europe, gathering a cult following that grew steadily upon each visit. Dressed in black and white and looking out of sight, the gloves were off and they were ready for anything.

In the year 1999, the Hives have a new bag of tricks and a handful of Fitzsimmons originals. They know exactly what to do - record a record so good the world can’t ignore it. They release Veni Vidi Vicious and nothing is ever the same. Rave reviews, more touring and that steadily growing cult following that can no longer fit into the clubs they play. A full year and a half of sold out shows later… Big time UK industry guy and all round music fan Alan McGee (Oasis, Primal Scream, Creation Records) sees the Hives on German TV and decides that this is important. He has the band put together a form of greatest hits for his Poptones label. Your New Favourite Band, as the result is dubbed, catches a sleeping England by surprise. Rock music that is exciting and dangerous not really being the toast of the town lately.

Cue "Rock is back!" headlines in newspapers and on TV. “We always knew the world would catch on, we just had to wait them in," as the band themselves say. Cue hits "Hate To Say I Told You So" and "Main Offender" and things are drastically different. People in the UK once again connect rock bands with showmanship, excitement and an actual good time. Your new favourite band? Indeed.

In the space of a few short months, the band then go on to conquer America and beyond. People everywhere now talk about, listen to and praise our five heroes. The world seems a little bit blacker and a little bit whiter. Phase Two is complete. Time to initiate Phase Three.

After touring for three years, the Hives suddenly decide on a full stop. A new record deal is signed and they go back to Hive Manor, their HQ in Fagersta, Sweden. Here they will spend all their time until they come up with a new sound, they promise. A more metronomic, monotonous and mechanical sound. “After playing the same songs for three years, we wanted to surprise ourselves again,” they say. This is where the traces end.

Well, The calendar now says 2004, and the Hives have been missing from the world for a year and a half. Their doubters and enemies have already begun scribbling their obituaries and their fans have to try and make do with the copycat bands that follow in their wake. Things look bleak…


After much research, the members of the Hives discovered that Tyrannosaurus Hives had to be located in their own backyard. Two weeks after touring stopped, digging would start. Reports of strange noises heard all over Fagersta commenced. As the ’90s layer was still covered in smelly crap, the first layer to be thoroughly searched contained the bleeps and blops of ’80s new wave. Interesting! They dug further. The metallic kerrang of ’70s punk. Wow! They dug further still. The shaking hair and swinging hips of ’60s rock and soul. Useful! Further… Slapback echo, twangy guitar - this must be the ’50s. Further. The primal force and sheer joy of ’40s R´n B. Good. Further….further…further. KRITA, JURA…


Tyrannosaurus Hives is all you hoped for and more.

Tyrannosaurus Hives is a record so full of potential hits, it would take a hundred songwriters working for a hundred years to come up with anything like it.

Tyrannosaurus Hives is an album recorded in Sweden by Pelle Gunnerfeldt, who also recorded their previous two, despite many of the world’s biggest-name producers lining up to work with them. “It’s the only way we wanted to do it,” they say.

Tyrannosaurus Hives is a record by a band so fired up that, if you look closely, you can see small drops of sweat when you open the disc .

Tyrannosaurus Hives is equal parts the end of something old and the start of something new.

Tyrannosaurus Hives has razor-sharp commentary on the world of the Hives today, something you can adapt to your own life and feel they are singing about you.

Tyrannosaurus Hives is the most highly anticipated album by the Hives since the dawn of mankind.

The dumb will nod and stomp in approval. The smart will debate its power forever.

Tyrannosaurus Hives is not an album put together by “dudes” “jamming”. It’s the result of young men tireless in their search for “better” and “more."

Tyrannosaurus Hives is not a record outlined to fit your life. You must fit your life to IT.

Tyrannosaurus Hives is not at all bad for a bunch of mid-20s Swedish guys from the sticks.

Tyrannosaurus Hives features songs such as:

"Walk Idiot Walk": The lead single. A tenacious bassline. A guitar riff so jagged it sounds like it was played with a cattleprod. Lyrics both enigmatic and crystal-clear about life on Planet Earth 2004. Great chorus too. "Two Timing Touch And Broken Bones": A drumbeat that sounds like a bullet train with a limp, guitars both classical and modern. This is a song that could only be from this album.

"Diabolic Scheme": The album’s “ballad," where a barrage of horror-movie strings fly in and out over a slow menacing beat. An equal mix of Screaming Jay Hawkins and modern R&B. Howlin Pelle earning his prefix with something that sounds like ad-libbed vocals about the deliberate escape and return of the Hives in the public eye.

"Abra Cadaver": The first sign of life, the album’s opener. 95.6 seconds of anti-subtle and super-intense havoc-wreaking.

As The Hives now gear up to explode across the world’s stages once more, they are rightly confident that they have at their disposal all the musical fire-power to complete the job. At the end of the liner notes on Veni Vidi Vicious, there ran the following citation: “Confucius says: Ah… The Hives. The future is theirs…should they want it”. The wise old fella had it right: with Tyrannosaurus Hives all ready to go, it’s going to be a black-and-white world for 2004 and beyond…

The Hives Bio from Discogs

Born in 1993 in Fagersta, Sweden, The Hives have long been a rock 'n’ roll force to be reckoned with. Their debut, 1997’s Barely Legal, shot thru the punk community like a runaway locomotive, with faster-than-fast blistering punk that had the punks cheering and raising bottles and cans, but left most of the mainstream going, "Oh… well… uhm what?". With 2000’s more studio-wise Veni Vidi Vicious, and the UK smash Your New Favourite Band (a compilation of songs from Barely Legal, VVV and the A.k.a I-D-I-O-T EP), however, The Hives wrote the book on the decade’s garage-rock success together with the likes of Detroit's The White Stripes to name but one of many.

Your New Favourite Band even went not silver, gold or even multi-platinum, but diamond, thanks to the hits ‘Hate To Say I Told You So’, ‘Main Offender’, ‘Supply And Demand’ and ‘Die, Alright!’ These songs blew people’s brains out and the boys in black and white got their first taste of radio and music television airplay. The world had crumbled and now greeted The Hives with open arms, endearing letters and red carpets, while hymns and children were produced in their honour. This black-and-white phenomenon toured constantly for three years and no-one wanted it to end, but the boys had decided to record again as they could not let go of the idea of reinventing not only rock 'n’ roll but also themselves.

Their third and – as the band had decided in their early teens with the black-and-white logic (no pun intended) of zealous youths – last record – as no band to their knowledge had ever made more than 3 good records in a row – 2004’s Tyrannosaurus Hives, successfully patted down the earth around the flag they’d placed atop this measly globe. With further hits like the unstoppable ‘Walk Idiot Walk’, ‘Two-Timing Touch & Broken Bones’ and ‘A Little More For Little You’, they once again repeated the cycle – "release new Hives record, conquer world by touring, repeat". And, God knows, like marauding vikings with much better dress sense, they conquered!

With 2007's mindblower The Black and White Album, on which they messed with the ‘Hives voice’ by for the first time entertaining the notion of outside influence, in the shape of music producers such as Pharrell Williams, Jacknife Lee and Dennis Herring, The Hives landed a fish so big not even Mother Earth could swallow it. The second big bang was a fact, and that, folks, was exactly what the first single/hit song from the album stated – ‘Tick Tick Boom!’ Once again the success cycle was repeated, and after the 400 gigs and 25 nights in hospitals that followed that record, The Hives again felt that three years on the road was sufficient. Even if they did manage to extend their live universe with visits to previously uncharted South American lands like Chile, Argentina and Brazil, they decided it was time to hit the studio again. It was time for the Big Kahuna, the Colossus of Rhodes, the greatest wonder the world had ever seen! It was time to present the laws of The Hives. It was time to write –– Lex Hives!!!

Perhaps having acquired a taste for working with big-shot producers on The B&W Album, they this time decided to track down the five biggest names in popular music for the job. The names that came up? Howlin’ Pelle Almqvist, Nicholaus Arson, Chris Dangerous, Dr. Matt Destruction, and Vigilante Carlstroem. The five members of The Hives knew that in order to make the boat rock, one nee .... Click here to read the full bio on DISCOGS.

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